Monthly Archives: November 2011

Bridging Theory and Practice for Language Rights

Check out a newly published article in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, co-authored by Health Justice Director, Nisha Agarwal, on the importance of language access in the pharmacy setting. This is an area where the evidence about the importance of providing language concordant services for patients who are limited English proficient (LEP) keeps growing and, despite all the discussion in medical circles about “evidence-based” policymaking, we continue to face resistance at state agencies charged with protecting and advancing public health. Instead of collaborative discussions about how to improve access to prescription medications for immigrant communities and reducing health disparities, we hear complaints about how language assistance services might put huge chain pharmacies out of business – immigrant scape-goating at its worst.

We’re taking our fight to the pages of research journals, as well as to the corridors of power in Albany and to the streets until we win. Join us in this effort! Send us an email and let us know that you’d like to join the coalition to ensure Safe Access for Everyone to prescription medications (SafeRx): healthjustice[at]nylpi.org.

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Filed under health disparities, immigrant health, immigrant rights, language access, legislation

A Community Mobilizes to End Medical Apartheid

Hello readers, we are pleased to announce that the peer-reviewed journal, Progress in Community Health Partnerships, has published a piece about our campaign with Bronx Health REACH to end segregation in the delivery of health care services by teaching hospitals in New York. You can download a copy of the piece here. Feedback welcome! We are using every avenue at our disposal to get the word out about this urgent issue, including the very types of publications that health care providers and policy decision-makers are likely to peruse.

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Filed under health disparities, legislation, people of color